By Mariordo Mario Roberto Duran Ortiz (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

By Mariordo Mario Roberto Duran Ortiz (Own work) [CC-BY-SA-3.0 (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0)], via Wikimedia Commons

During National Bike Month, NYC launched its long-awaited Bike Share program, which is similar to Zipcar. You pay an annual membership to gain access to public bikes around the city. Sounds pretty cool, and it’s been making headlines — but they aren’t all positive.

One controversial issue to come up is a sensitive one: Weight limits. It’s been reported that Citi Bikes will only accept riders who are under 260 pounds, at the recommendation of the bike manufacturer.

Biking around the city would be the perfect way for anyone to stay healthy and even shed a few pounds, so plenty of people are upset to hear that they may not be eligible for the program. But whether this “safety” precaution is legitimate or excessive, there is a loophole.

Jon Orcutt, Department of Transportation policy director, did not say that the city will be enforcing the weight limit. At least, they won’t be pulling people over to check if they weigh in under the limit. “I think people will be self-selecting, practical and safe,” he  told the NY Post.

What are your thoughts on the weight limit for the Bike Share program? Fair or too much? Let us know below.